Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Proverbs, Apertures and a Word Jar

My good buddy Toirdealbhach, over on Tea and Peach, has taken up my idea of using proverbs when writing. We discussed writing a piece of poetry or prose with a specific proverb in mind and so we picked, "A windy day is not for thatching". He'll write a piece in Irish and I'll write a piece in English. Now I haven't thought about this proverb much but I'll have a go at it soon when I have time. Talk about a busy November.

Take a look at Toirdealbhach's blog post Proverb prompts. You can read a piece of his written around the proverb: There’s no place like home.

On the poetry front I'm keeping up with the poetry a day project. It's nice to be a part of a group of poets who are also doing the project. I've been getting quite a few ideas and it's nice to see the different approaches and voices. I've been trying to do something a little different recently and making an effort to stay away from my usual imagery. Here's yesterday's poem:

When the Day Slowly Shuts its Aperture  
we crawl out of shells and stroll along
wooden piers while street lights bathe us in sepia. 
We take off our shoes to walk on salty sand
and traipse over wind-reddened rocks.
We listen to the melody of shushing waves
and hold tight for warmth 
like limpets and barnacles hugging the bay.

And with our eyes we picture our house
with a strong timber frame cut deep into a rocky face. 
Light flits in an upper window as a child drifts to sleep. 

In other news I've set myself up with a word jar. I have random words inside a jar and I pick one when I need a prompt and write something around the word. Today's word is spiral.

3 comments:

lostgander said...

I like this one a lot, Taidgh. The 'we' is confusing in a mysterious way and the imagery evokes a yearning feeling. Well done!

Taidgh Lynch said...

Thanks Sean! Nice to see you enjoyed it. I've got to get serious with the edits soon. I'll get something in the post to you soon. Take care.

Toirdealbhach Ó Lionáird said...

I notice that this ambiguity is a common feature in your work of late Taidgh. The word jar is a nice idea - better give up the recycling! P.S. Thanks for the plug!